New Editors’ Perspective on Innovations in Care Delivery section

Healthcare innovations are frequently in the news and factors influencing care delivery are evolving at a fast pace. Most of what you hear though is not specific to neurology. The Innovations in Care Delivery section aims to fill this void. The initiation of this section by Bob Gross and Ray Dorsey demonstrates the commitment of the journal Neurology to publishing rigorous health services research aiming to describe, develop, test, implement, or evaluate the impact of the many organizational, behavioral, social, financial, and technological factors that influence neurologic care delivery, health, and well-being. Your submissions on these topics will be of strong interest here. This section also curates relevant articles, and utilizes blogs, podcasts, and interviews, to extend information and discussions on these important topics. The Innovations in Care Delivery section will also be a resource for collaboration and training. Soon, this site will maintain a list of data sources and persons experienced in using these. Available large databases create substantial opportunities for hypothesis generating research, and new discoveries about trends and the impact of healthcare delivery changes. Finally, we will work closely with the policy and practice sections of the American Academy of Neurology to keep you up-to-date on the most important issues regarding neurologic care delivery.

Brian C. Callaghan, MD, MS

Brian C. Callaghan, MD, MS

Dr. Brian Callaghan is an Assistant Professor and health services researcher in the Department of Neurology at the University of Michigan Health System. He is fellowship trained in Neuromuscular Disorders. His research focus is on improving the efficiency of neurologic diagnostic testing. He is specifically interested in neuroimaging for headache, which is one of the most common reasons for a patient to seek medical care. His research has shown that headache neuroimaging is common, costly, increasing over time, and often performed in low risk populations. He has also investigated the appropriateness of diagnostic testing in patients with distal symmetric polyneuropathy. His work has demonstrated a high variation in testing for polyneuropathy with most of the costs driven by MRI and electrodiagnostic studies. He completed a Master’s of Science program in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis at the University of Michigan and a healthcare policy fellowship at the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation (CHRT). He also serves as a member of the Medical Economics and Management (MEM) and Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation (GDDI) committees of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

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